Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Kiki Smith, Magnolia Editions at Peters Projects this weekend

Kiki Smith - Congregation, 2014
Jacquard tapestry with hand painting and gold leaf, 116 x 76 in. Edition of 10

"Kiki Smith: Woven Tales" opens this Friday, May 13th at Peters Projects in Santa Fe, NM. This spectacular exhibition features all of Smith's tapestries to date (nearly a dozen), hanging together in one room!

There will be an artist talk with Kiki Smith and Donald & Era Farnsworth at Peters Projects on Saturday, May 14th at 11 am.

Kiki Smith - Visitor, 2015
Jacquard tapestry, 116 x 76 in. Edition of 10

Also opening Friday at Peters Projects is a traveling adaptation of the "Magnolia Editions: Innovation and Collaboration" exhibition first presented at the Sonoma County Museum of Art earlier this year.

"Magnolia Editions: Innovation and Collaboration" is curated by Randy Rosenberg and includes work from the last three decades by artists such as Robert Arneson, David Best, Enrique Chagoya, Chuck Close, Bruce Conner, Lewis deSoto, Donald & Era Farnsworth, Guillermo Galindo, Mildred Howard, Robert Hudson, Deborah Oropallo, Mel Ramos, The St. Petersburg Travelers, and Richard Wagener.

Bruce Conner - ANGEL WALL, CANYON DE CHELLEY, 2003/1976
Archival pigmented inkjet on Rives BFK white, 17.75 x 23.5 in. Edition of 10

Peters Projects is located at 1011 Paseo De Peralta, Santa Fe, NM. If you can't make it to the opening, check out the shows on the Peters Projects website!

More work by Kiki Smith from Magnolia Editions

Thursday, May 5, 2016

Recent shows & events: Pace in Palo Alto, Close at Magnolia, Kala Auction 2016, and more


Donald Farnsworth shows Chuck Close new experiments with recreating quattrocento-era paper at Magnolia Editions.

Congratulations to Pace Gallery on the opening of their new location in Palo Alto, California.

Magnolia Editions staff were on hand at the opening of the inaugural exhibition last month, which featured work by James Turrell alongside a selection of Pace artists including Chuck Close; both Turrell and Close also attended the opening, with Close visiting Magnolia later in the week to review proofs of new works on paper (more photos here).

James Turrell, Chuck Close, and Era Farnsworth at Pace Gallery's new location in Palo Alto.


Chuck Close, Donald Farnsworth, Era Farnsworth, Nicholas Price, and Tallulah Terryll at Magnolia Editions.

Donald Farnsworth, Nicholas Price, and Chuck Close at Magnolia Editions.

Congratulations to Enrique Chagoya on a wonderful show at Anglim-Gilbert’s new gallery location on Minnesota St in San Francisco:

Prints by Enrique Chagoya (created at & published by Magnolia Editions) at Anglim-Gilbert.

Era Farnsworth at Anglim-Gilbert with Gallery Manager Shannon Trimble.

Congratulations also to Nora Pauwels and John DeMerritt, as well as to Rene Bott and Pam Paulson, for being honored recently at Kala Institute's 2016 Auction & Gala:

Nora Pauwels and John DeMerritt are honored as Artists of the Year by Kala Institute Executive Director Archana Horsting.

Nora Pauwels and John DeMerritt are honored as Artists of the Year by Kala Institute Executive Director Archana Horsting.

Audience of artists and art lovers at the Kala Institute 2016 Auction.

Pam Paulson and Renee Bott of Paulson Bott Press are honored for their contributions to the community by Kala Institute Executive Director Archana Horsting.

Check out many more photos of Chuck Close with new works in progress at Magnolia by viewing the full photo album at Magnolia's Facebook page!

Friday, April 29, 2016

Openings and Events: SF Art Fair, "PAPER" in Point Reyes, and more

Mixed-media works by Deborah Oropallo (created at Magnolia Editions) featured at artMRKT San Francisco.

Magnolia Editions is pleased to announce various events and exhibitions in the Bay Area this weekend and beyond:

As pictured above, the international SF Art Fair, officially known as artMRKT San Francisco, will be held April 27 - May 1, 2016 at the Festival Pavilion at Fort Mason Center in San Francisco.

This Saturday April 30, from 1 - 4 pm please join us for the opening of PAPER, an exhibition curated by Inez Storer and featuring work by Storer, Enrique Chagoya, Donald & Era Farnsworth, Heather Peters, Tallulah Terryll, Andrew Romanoff, Carrie Lederer, and more! PAPER is happening at Toby's Gallery: 11250 State Route One, Point Reyes Station, CA 94956.

Selections from Donald & Era Farnsworth's Art Notes project, included in the PAPER exhibition in Point Reyes.

Then on Sunday May 1 from 3 - 5 pm, Natalie Ng's "Maasai Women and Four Legged Friends" exhibition of oil paintings opens at the Robert Mondavi Winery with a reception and wine tasting: Robert Mondavi Winery, 7801 St. Helena Highway, Oakville, CA 94562.

Tuesday, January 26, 2016

Donald Farnsworth this Thurs. Jan 28 at the Art Museum of Sonoma County

Donald Farnsworth and Chuck Close at Close's New York studio, 2011.

Please join Magnolia director Donald Farnsworth this Thursday, January 28, 2016 at 6:30 pm for a special talk at the Art Museum of Sonoma County in Santa Rosa, CA on the occasion of the museum's "Magnolia Editions: Innovation and Collaboration" exhibition.

The Art Museum of Sonoma County is located at 505 B St, Santa Rosa, CA 95401 (click for directions). Please note that this museum is in Santa Rosa – not to be confused with the similarly named museum at 551 Broadway in Sonoma.

Donald Farnsworth and Rupert Garcia at Magnolia Editions with Garcia's 2010 print Obama From Douglass, on view now at the Art Museum of Sonoma County.

"The Magician Behind Magnolia Editions" will detail thirty years of collaboration and experimentation at Magnolia Editions and Farnsworth's work to introduce new techniques and technologies to some of the art world's biggest names.

Kiki Smith and Donald Farnsworth at Magnolia Editions, 2012.

The St. Petersburg Travelers (Donald & Era Farnsworth, Inez Storer & Andrew Romanoff) - Banquet at Gatchina, 2013
Acrylic and modeling paste on heavy linen. Image 47 x 71 inches; linen 56.6 x 82.5 inches. Edition of 3
(on view now at the Art Museum of Sonoma County)

Curated by Randy Rosenberg, "Magnolia Editions: Innovation and Collaboration" includes work from the last three decades by artists such as Robert Arneson, Squeak Carnwath, Don Ed Hardy, Enrique Chagoya, Chuck Close, Guy Diehl, Aziz + Cucher, Mildred Howard, William T. Wiley, Mary Hull Webster, Hung Liu, Richard Wagener, Doug Hall, Faisal Abdu'Allah, Kiki Smith, Donald and Era Farnsworth, Inez Storer and Andrew Romanoff, and more, representing a host of media ranging from etchings, collographs, and other more traditional printmaking technologies to Jacquard tapestries, UV-cured acrylic prints on handmade paper fabricated from clothing, and electronic mixed-media sculpture.

We hope you'll join us at the museum on Thursday evening!

Donald Farnsworth and Deborah Oropallo at Magnolia Editions, 2011.

Art Museum of Sonoma County website

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Magnolia closed for the holidays, Dec 21 – Jan 1

Happy holidays from these Magnolia friends, colleagues and staff, seen here at the opening in Santa Rosa on Saturday!
For more photos, please visit Magnolia on Facebook.

Magnolia Editions will close for the holidays between December 21st, 2015 and January 1st, 2016. The studio will reopen in the new year beginning January 4th, 2016.

In the meantime, we encourage you to visit the Art Museum of Sonoma County in Santa Rosa, CA for "Magnolia Editions: Innovation and Collaboration," curated by Randy Rosenberg.

The museum is located at 425 7th St, Santa Rosa, CA 95401 (click for directions). "Magnolia Editions: Innovation and Collaboration" includes work from the last three decades by artists such as Robert Arneson, Squeak Carnwath, Don Ed Hardy, Enrique Chagoya, Chuck Close, Guy Diehl, Aziz + Cucher, Mildred Howard, William T. Wiley, Mary Hull Webster, Hung Liu, Richard Wagener, Doug Hall, Faisal Abdu'Allah, Kiki Smith, Donald and Era Farnsworth, and more.

The show runs through February 7, 2016; the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday from 11 am to 5 pm. For more photos from the opening, please visit Magnolia on Facebook.

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Opening this Saturday, Dec 12 at the Art Museum of Sonoma County

Time-lapse video by Ezequiel Narcisi of the "Innovation and Collaboration" exhibition going up at the Art Museum of Sonoma County


"Magnolia Editions: Innovation and Collaboration," curated by Randy Rosenberg, opens at the Art Museum of Sonoma County in Santa Rosa, CA this Saturday, December 12, 2015 with a public reception from 6-8 pm.

The museum is located at 425 7th St, Santa Rosa, CA 95401 (click for directions). Please note that this museum is in Santa Rosa – not to be confused with the similarly named museum at 551 Broadway in Sonoma.

"Magnolia Editions: Innovation and Collaboration" includes work from the last three decades by artists such as Robert Arneson, Squeak Carnwath, Don Ed Hardy, Enrique Chagoya, Chuck Close, Guy Diehl, Aziz + Cucher, Mildred Howard, William T. Wiley, Mary Hull Webster, Hung Liu, Richard Wagener, Doug Hall, Faisal Abdu'Allah, Kiki Smith, Donald and Era Farnsworth, Inez Storer and Andrew Romanoff, and more, representing a host of media ranging from etchings, collographs, and other more traditional printmaking technologies to Jacquard tapestries, UV-cured acrylic prints on handmade paper fabricated from clothing, and electronic mixed-media sculpture.

Time-lapse video by Ezequiel Narcisi of the "Innovation and Collaboration" exhibition going up at the Art Museum of Sonoma County


Stay tuned for exhibition-related programming in the coming months, including a talk with William T. Wiley and Mary Hull Webster, and a walk-through of Magnolia featuring presentations from Donald Farnsworth and Guy Diehl.

We hope you'll join us at the opening in Santa Rosa this Saturday!

Time-lapse video by Ezequiel Narcisi of the "Innovation and Collaboration" exhibition going up at the Art Museum of Sonoma County


Art Museum of Sonoma County website

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Enrique Chagoya - Caníbales Daguerrotípicos

Enrique Chagoya - Caníbales Daguerrotípicos, 2015.
Inkjet on RC photo paper, 6.5 x 95 in. Edition of 12

In his 2015 print edition Caníbales Daguerrotípicos, Enrique Chagoya’s “reverse Modernism” gives birth to a series of scenes halfway between dream and art historical legend. The print is structured like a pre-Columbian codex, reading right to left with each section paginated by traditional Mayan numbers; but instead of printing on the Amate bark paper often used for his codices, here Chagoya’s imagery is filtered through the reflective, grisaille, silver-grained look of a 19th-century daguerreotype and printed on heavyweight, glossy RC photo paper.

Detail from Enrique Chagoya - Caníbales Daguerrotípicos, 2015. Chagoya's "reverse Modernism" dresses a photograph of Pablo Picasso and his wife in African masks; behind them stands a vintage Hervé advertisement with text detourned by the artist; above their umbrella soars a plane-shaped coffin from West Ghana.

Caníbales Daguerrotípicos hinges on a dreamlike collage technique pioneered by the Surrealists, but can ultimately be read as an inversion of 20th-century Modernism, a strategy for which the artist has coined the term “reverse Modernism.” Artists identified with both Surrealist and Modernist movements were enthusiastic in their affection for art from Africa and indigeneous American cultures, extending their appreciation for the “noble savage” to bold, even shameless appropriation – what Chagoya deftly terms “cannibalization” — of formal aspects of these civilization’s artworks. Picasso’s paintings mimicking African masks are the most well-known example, which Chagoya links here to a broader Modernist tendency spanning various creative disciplines: from Henry Moore’s imitation of Aztec sculptures of the god Chac-Mool in his sculptures of seated figures to Frank Lloyd Wright’s use of Mayan architectural motifs in his designs for well-known Los Angeles landmarks. Caníbales Daguerrotípicos reverses the flow of these influences, channeling an alternate history wherein culture is produced by “primitive” civilizations’ domination and appropriation of Western techniques and imagery.

Detail from Enrique Chagoya - Caníbales Daguerrotípicos, 2015. At left, a famed Eduard S. Curtis photograph is interrupted by an Apple iPad billboard and a small running figure from Cartier-Bresson; at right, a Piet Mondrian-inspired dress by Yves St Laurent adorns a sculpture of Coatlique, the Aztec goddess of life and death, topped with an Aztec skull of the dead.

Caníbales Daguerrotípicos also cannibalizes the work of various photographers who made a career of depicting indigeneous peoples, such as Eduard S. Curtis’s images of Native Americans and Irving Penn’s pictures of Aborigines in Papua New Guinea. With a sense of humor and a keen understanding of the often one-sided historical exchange between Western art traditions and the “noble savage,” Caníbales Daguerrotípicos’ dreamscape turns the feeding frenzy of Modernism on its head as photographs by Curtis, Penn, Cartier-Bresson and Agustin Casasola are all subject to Chagoya’s playful yet deliberate appropriation. Chagoya says he identifies with a definition of surrealist humor once given by Andre Breton in a radio interview – “Humor is the triumph of pleasure over pain under the worst conditions for pleasure” – noting its parallels with the gallows humor common in Mexico, and paraphrases a quote from Breton identifying surrealism not as a category of art but instead as a fundamental aspect of existence.

Detail from Enrique Chagoya - Caníbales Daguerrotípicos, 2015. Thanks to "reverse Modernism," a Mexican street scene by Agustin Casasola is newly populated by Surrealist leader Andre Breton and filmmaker Jean Cocteau.

Given that the cast of Caníbales Daguerrotípicos features several pre-eminent Surrealist artists and writers, it is fitting that the print should take the form of a dreamscape. Patricia Hickson has written of the artist’s codices that “these nuanced, imaginary adventures with a social conscience could only exist in the space of a dream,” recalling Chagoya’s paraphrasing of a pre-Columbian religious precept: “life is a dream,” he says; “when you die, you wake up.” The temperature of information is cooler in this work than in Chagoya’s previous codices, making it even more dreamlike; its muted palette gives the impression of a black-and-white vision unearthed from the depths of the subconscious, or a hand-tinted antique photograph from a mysterious bygone era. 

Detail from Enrique Chagoya - Caníbales Daguerrotípicos, 2015; a Henry Moore sculpture wears the head of Aztec god Chac-Mool.

In Andre Breton’s first Manifesto of Surrealism, the foundation of the movement is identified as “the omnipotence of dreams” and its fundamental goal as “the resolution of those two seemingly contradictory states, dream and reality,” in a perpetual coexistence. Breton’s own history combines elements of dream and reality, especially after having been retold and embellished over the years. Intrigued by Mexico and its rich vein of mythopoetic tradition, Surrealism’s founder famously visited the country in 1938 as an ambassador of the burgeoning art movement. The story goes that Breton, having arrived in Mexico but lacking the ability to explain himself in Castillian, provided a local carpenter with a drawing in linear perspective of a table he wished to commission. The carpenter dutifully returned two weeks later with a table built exactly to the literal specifications of the drawing – that is, ignoring the perspective completely, with one side dramatically shorter and more narrow than the other. According to legend, Breton threw up his hands, sighed “I have nothing to teach these people,” and promptly packed his bags to return to Paris.

Yet in Breton’s Perspective cavalière, a more plausible story comes to light. Breton writes: “Benjamin Péret told me that, in Mexico, a carpenter —surely improvised—received the charge of making a bedroom like one in a photograph included in a catalogue. The man managed to create the bed, the table and the chairs exactly as they looked in perspective. Why not pause placidly in the elusive mirrored wardrobe?” In the end, no one can say with certainty that this encounter with the carpenter ever really happened; it might be nothing more than a parable drawn from Breton’s imagination.


Detail from Enrique Chagoya - Caníbales Daguerrotípicos, 2015; models in YSL Piet Mondrian Pop Art dresses also sport heads from Mexican wrestler Blue Demon and Irving Penn photos of Papua New Guinea, and a Mayan head meets the dandified body of Jean Cocteau.

In Caníbales Daguerrotípicos, Chagoya pauses time itself in that “elusive mirrored wardrobe” of Surrealist dream logic; the impossible or anachronistic situations depicted in his imagery call into question the supposed infallibility of a linear historical narrative, revealing instead the kaleidoscopic, contradictory nature of our understanding of reality. Whether by inviting Aboriginal masks to disrupt and subvert a 1960s advertisement for Piet Mondrian-themed Pop Art dresses by Yves Saint Laurent; dressing performance artist Joseph Beuys in Native American warrior garb; or returning Breton (with contemporaries Marcel Duchamp, Luis Bunuel, and Jean Cocteau) to the streets of Mexico City for another chance to unlock the mysteries of Mexican surrealism, Caníbales Daguerrotípicos reminds us that history’s heroes and their exploits are merely characters in an ongoing fantasy – one that is ours to dream, and ours to decipher. 


Detail from Enrique Chagoya - Caníbales Daguerrotípicos, 2015; at left, Frank Lloyd Wright considers a contemporary monument to native peoples in Mexico City; at right, Joseph Beuys tries on the Native American headdress and breastplate of an Eduard S. Curtis portrait subject.

More art by Enrique Chagoya from Magnolia Editions